As Legislature heads to special session, Haler challenges governor to stick to his ‘no new taxes’ promise

CONTACT: Brendon Wold, Deputy Communications Director – (360) 786-7698
Rep. Larry Haler – (360) 786-7986

 

As Legislature heads to special session, Haler challenges governor to stick to his 'no new taxes' promise


The Legislature adjourned today without passing an operating budget for the 2013-15 biennium.  With at least one special session looming on the horizon in the near future, Rep. Larry Haler, R-Richland, laid much of the responsibility at the feet of Gov. Jay Inslee for breaking his campaign promise to not raise taxes.   Haler released the following statement today:
“It's unfortunate that once again the Legislature is heading to a special session.  However, much of the debate and discourse we're seeing today could have been avoided if budget writers knew exactly how much money the state has to spend.  We know the citizens of Washington want the state to live within its means just like every family and employer around the state has had to.  We've seen the recent revenue forecast; we know exactly how much money the state has.  The budget conversation and debate should start and end at this point: existing revenues.   “However, because Democrats sued the state to eliminate the two-thirds legislative vote requirement to raise taxes, and because the governor is now publically going back on his campaign promise to not raise taxes, the debate has shifted.  Democrat budget writers in the House and in the governor's office are now debating which taxes to raise and by how much.  Instead of discussing what important programs should be funded, they're deliberating on how much more money to take from taxpayers' pockets.   “I urge the governor and the House Democrats to put down their desire to raise taxes on the hardworking people of Washington state.  The Senate Majority Coalition Caucus passed a bipartisan budget that did not raise taxes, fully-funded education, and was balanced for four years.  While I don't agree with everything in their budget, it's a good place to start.  Unfortunately, the other side can't even come to the table to discuss what should be in the budget until they've determined how much more money to take from taxpayers.   “In the case of this special session, I believe the citizens want us to stand with them against unnecessary tax increases.”

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Washington State House Republican Communications
houserepublicans.wa.gov